Dr. Pat Hogan

Dr. Hogan is an oceanographer who serves as the Ocean Sciences Branch Chief for the National Centers for Environmental Information. In addition to directing the global ocean forecasting research, Hogan has been modeling and forecasting the Gulf of Mexico circulation for many years. These models have been and are used by many in the community for research and for boundary conditions to nested regional models within the Gulf.

As an oceanographer at the Naval Research Laboratory — Stennis Space Center, Dr. Hogan has been working in the area of ocean dynamics and prediction since 1987. He served as head of the Ocean Monitoring and Prediction Systems Section from 2007 to 2009 and since 2009 has served as the head of the Open Ocean Processes and Prediction Systems Section. His interests include ocean circulation dynamics, coupled process studies, probabilistic forecast methods, and development and application of real-time forecast systems and products. Hogan serves on the international board GODAE Ocean View Science Team. He has authored or co-authored more than 50 refereed journal publications and is the recipient of five NRL Alan Berman Publication Awards. He is also a member of the American Geophysical Union and the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. Hogan received his Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2000, his M.S. degree in Geophysics from the University of New Orleans in 1987 and B.S. in Geology from the University of Kansas in 1985.

In addition to directing the global ocean forecasting research as section head (inclusive, i.e. research to operations), Hogan has been modeling and forecasting the Gulf of Mexico circulation for many years. He has employed the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). He employed the first real-time 1/25 degree (~4 km) HYCOM-based forecast system for the Gulf of Mexico, which continues to produce a 7-day forecast every day. Variants of this system have been running since about 2007 and the results are made available to the community through the HYCOM.org file server. These results have been and are used by many in the community for research and for boundary conditions to nested regional models within the Gulf. For the last several years, he has directed a real-time ensemble forecasting effort in the Gulf of Mexico designed to perform long-term (~60 day) predictions of the Loop Current Eddy shedding process. Hogan has also employed a coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave forecast system to study coupled processes in the Gulf.

His GCOOS board term expires in Fall 2022.